Lava Update: Wednesday, July 27, 2016

A day early, our regularly scheduled overflight was pushed up to document 61G’s newly formed ocean entry. Low cloud cover almost made us opt for a straight shot at the coast, but an opening allowed us to get a peek at the active lava pond’s bubbling and sloshing within Pu‘u ‘O‘o, and a look at source of 61G via the skylight high on the northeast flank. The ocean entry did not disappoint, as a robust lobe of molten lava cascaded down the sea cliff into the ocean, creating a small steam plume that rose into the early morning sky. The activity is slowly creating a little delta at the base of the cliff, as fresh black sand and rubble accumulate. Visitors were present to witness this spectacle of nature, by land, sea, and AIR.  

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Sunrise over the new ocean entry at Kapaahu, within the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Visitors by land, sea, and air observed the serene scene of new land being created.
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The lava pond within Pu‘u ‘O‘o was very active, as bubbling and sloshing were clearly visible.
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A view of the ocean entry looking west, with Pulama Pali and the Ka‘u coast in the background.
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Gary Sliek, our friend with the baseball cap and pink tshirt, observes the flow cascade over the cliff and into the sea. Gary’s home in Kalapana Gardens was taken by lava in 2010, and has since rebuilt on his property.
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A view of the new ocean entry, with the source of the flow, Pu‘u ‘O‘o (the little bump on the horizon), in the background. Rising gases on Pulama Pali delineates the path of 61G.

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